Chemical resistance of gloves

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Manalto
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Chemical resistance of gloves

Postby Manalto » Fri Aug 11, 2017 10:06 pm

I found this chart that I thought might be useful to some here.

https://glovesbyweb.com/pages/gloves-ch ... ance-chart


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nhguy
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Re: Chemical resistance of gloves

Postby nhguy » Sat Aug 12, 2017 10:14 am

I found it interesting some chemicals had no good glove choices.

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Lily left the valley
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Re: Chemical resistance of gloves

Postby Lily left the valley » Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:39 pm

Thanks for the link! Good info, for certain.

nhguy wrote:I found it interesting some chemicals had no good glove choices.

Maybe mad scientist rubber gloves?

I have a pair of heavy duty rubber electrician's gloves that look like that. Now I'm trying to remember if they are natural rubber or latex rubber, but I'm fairly certain they're natural. I haven't had reason to wear those for a while. Image below is pulled from web, yet similar in appearance to mine.
Image
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nhguy
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Re: Chemical resistance of gloves

Postby nhguy » Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:18 pm

I use a black rubber glove that has a cloth liner to clean metal parts with acetone. I've tried a few different ones over the years some turn rock hard in a few weeks. I've used another kind with 5F5 stripper that was a thin black rubber.

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Manalto
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Re: Chemical resistance of gloves

Postby Manalto » Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:34 pm

What inspired this was when I washed down the wood-paneled walls of the house in Alabama with mineral spirits, wearing latex gloves. I knew when I started it probably wasn't a great idea, but was loath to make yet another trip to the store. So, I wound up doing the job bare-handed, with the added inconvenience of disintegrated latex flapping around.
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Lily left the valley
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Re: Chemical resistance of gloves

Postby Lily left the valley » Sat Aug 12, 2017 6:59 pm

Manalto wrote:What inspired this was when I washed down the wood-paneled walls of the house in Alabama with mineral spirits, wearing latex gloves. I knew when I started it probably wasn't a great idea, but was loath to make yet another trip to the store. So, I wound up doing the job bare-handed, with the added inconvenience of disintegrated latex flapping around.
Oh dear. I know I've done similar sorts of things in different situations. Especially if it was something I hadn't done before and didn't know that this one difference in choice of X would have saved me the trouble/annoyance/mess I ran into from not knowing.
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Re: Chemical resistance of gloves

Postby phil » Fri Aug 25, 2017 6:50 pm

there are electrical gloves for working with high voltage. as I recall they need to be stored correctly and inspected by one who is qualified on a regular basis to comply with regs. they probably have equipment to check them.
as a veryt quick check you can blow them up slightly to see if they leak. They aren't made for chemical resistance, but their electrical insulating properties. The higher the voltage the more precautions you need to take and there are a lot of rules regarding distance, voltage and the training people need to have to be in that area. this isn't for house wiring but working near live wires at much higher voltages such as power lines. those ones you have are likely past their best before date. I think there is also a pair of cotton gloves that are meant to be used in combination with the ones lily showed.

I find the latex and vinyl ones pretty useless unless you are just using latex paint and want to keep your hands clean. the Nitrile ones are ok for a lot of stuff. some brands have thicker or thinner choices. I like to buy the extra large ones , some brands I can take off and some turn inside out when you pull them off. If I can slip my hands out I use less as I'll use them until I need to change them but at work it's not really saving anything if you need to take time to play with them to save a nickle on more gloves but at home I'm more thrifty.
The long stripping gloves are the only ones really good for stripper, they looks similar to the ones Lily posted. They take some of the feeling away if you need to do finicky stuff but they will take the stripper without dissolving on you. Ones made for doing dishes are no good for stripping.

I see a lot of difference between makers so If I buy them I open the box and try one to see if I can get my hand out or if I have to dispose of them every time.

If you get a tear change them. I'm sure we've all see it where we continued working with a torn glove and it is even worse than no glove as it will trap the stuff against your skin.

In hot weather I need to pull them off after not too long, or my hands can't breath. this opens your pores like if you were to soak in the tub , making your skin even more susceptible to being penetrated by the nasty chemicals .

too much exposure will cause dermatitis and your skin will become more and more sensitive to smaller amounts of exposure. It's always worth looking after your hands. Latex allergies are also fairly common. My dad had it in a big way and I couldn't count the number of times this was disregarded in the hospital despite the big latex allergy signs all around him. some hospitals and such are steering away from latex use completely for this reason. once it started up his face, chest hands and all over would get dry and crack like crazy. very painful.

human skin is amazing stuff. You can dip your hands in gasoline and survive and they are self healing and your skin continuously replenishes itself , even if you die them it won't stay. what a great invention!
a lot of the stuff is accumulative. If I get my hands in too much grease and oil Ill break out in little tiny bumps and it's because I've done a lot that I shouldn't do. It really isn't smart.


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